OSCON 2008 – Day 1

Technically, it’s day 2…but it’s day 1-ish for me.

I got into Portland around 2PM local time.  Checked-in to the hotel, then ran over to the convention center to check-in for the conference.  Probably the worst conference bag I’ve ever got.  That said, I think I have 5 computer backpacks lying around by now…so I’m definitely on overload.  Tech conferences need to move on to something else.

Not being familiar with the area and having not eaten in about 10 hrs, I went the path of least resistance and stopped by the mexican restuarant in the hotel (come to find out later it’s named “Eduardo’s Cantina”…if I’d known that, I probably would have just moved along).  I ended up chatting for a good long while with Josh Marinacci from the JavaFX team at Sun…which was cool because we’ve been working with JavaFX for well over a year now at work (I don’t think many people can say that…and even less could say they have an app in production using JavaFX).

Later in the night, they had an “Extravaganza” back over at the convention center.  There where 3 main parts (that I stayed for):

Mark Shuttleworth: Founder of the Ubuntu project, as well as the commercial company supporting Ubuntu, Canonical.

He spoke about the economics of open source, software development methodologies (specifically Agile/Scrum/XP) and building software that encourages others to extend.  I’m sure my synopsis doesn’t do it justice, but overall a good talk.

Next, O’Reilly/Google gave out some Open Source awards.  I’m sure you can check out their site for the low-down

Finally (for me), Robert Lefkowitz gave a talk about software development methodologies.  The theme of Agile/XP came up yet again.  It definitely feels like (at least from attending conventions) that we’re at a tipping point on Agile methodoligy acceptance.  One thought I hadn’t had until tonite is that this is closely tied to the rise of open source.  In most open source projects, there aren’t a lot of requirements made up front..people either use (and by extension, like) what you’ve built, or they don’t and go elsewhere.  If they do like your product, instead of creating “requirements” for new features, they just submit bug reports…which get triaged appropriately.  Sounds pretty efficient.

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